SOLD THIS MONTH!!!

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So people around town have been asking me how is business, are you keeping busy, what is the market like?  Well I have heard you loud and clear.

Every Week from here on out I will post and update of the homes the Harcourts Team has sold in the last week with the price and address.  We are in a very exciting time right now with all of the positive things that are happening in our AMAZING community.

So today is the first of many that will give a recap of what we at Harcourts Realty are doing in our community.

Have an awesome day and remember to have FUN!!!

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HOMES SOLD IN MARCH SO FAR.

As promised…  Here are the homes sold this month so far in Northern Nevada by Harcourts NV1 Realty.

This market is on fire right now.  If you are looking to sell drop me a line.  Interest rates are the lowest they have been since 2013 and there is not much out there to buy.   As you all know I work with both Sellers and Buyers.   In this market working with both keeps me knowing what the other side of the fence is going through.

Look forward to hearing from you.   

Homeowners you could be sitting on a nice payday.
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2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 680 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 11 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Reno/Sparks Market Report

sold and pending homes in reno sparks

Currently there are 981 sales pending in the market overall, leaving 1324 listings still for sale. The resulting pending ratio is 42.6% (981 divided by 2,305).

So you might be asking yourself, that’s great… but what exactly does it mean? I’m glad you asked!
The pending ratio indicates the supply & demand of the market. Specifically, a high ratio means that listings are in
demand and quickly going to contract. Alternatively, a low ratio means there are not enough qualified buyers for the
existing supply.

Taking a closer look, we notice that the $200K – $300K price range has a relatively large number of contracts pending sale.

We also notice that the $200K – $300K price range has a relatively large inventory of properties for sale at 363 listings.

The average list price (or asking price) for all properties in this market is $586,079.
A total of 3252 contracts have closed in the last 6 months with an average
sold price of $290,184. Breaking it down, we notice that the $200K –
$300K price range contains the highest number of sold listings.
Alternatively, a total of 689 listings have failed to sell in that same period
of time. Listings may fail to sell for many reasons such as being priced
too high, having been inadequately marketed, the property was in poor
condition, or perhaps the owner had second thoughts about selling at this
particular time. The $200K – $300K price range has the highest number of
off-market listings at 215 properties.

 

Reno_and_Sparks Market Report

Great article by the RGJ.com Talking about our housing market.

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Seven years after the Reno-Sparks housing bubble popped, the area’s real estate market finds itself in a much different situation.

From affordability to new home construction, here are seven things you should know about the Northern Nevada real estate market.

Stability is the new normal: In the last decade, the story of the Reno-Sparks real estate market was akin to the diary of a roller coaster rider. There’s the steep climb to the top as it reached its crazy highs during 2006 and 2007, followed by an equally steep drop to the bottom.

This year, however, has been markedly different.

After seeing noticeable appreciation on the last couple of years, home prices have reached a plateau in the last few months. Since June, the median price of an existing home in Reno-Sparks have stuck to a holding pattern in the $250,000 range.

“Stabilization is the trend for home pricing in Northern Nevada and Nevada as a whole,” said Peter Counts, a graduate assistant with the Lied Institute for Real Estate Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The institute produces a regular housing report with the Nevada Department of Business and Industry.

For those who remember the crazy days of the overheated market and the resulting fallout, stable is a good thing. For the Reno/Sparks Association of Realtors, the pricing trend of the last few months could indicate something the area has not seen for quite some time: a more normal market.

“From 2008 to 2012, we had so many distressed properties that we did not see the traditional winter slowdown we’ve seen in the 20 years before that,” said Mark Ashworth, RSAR president. “I believe this is a sign that we’re returning to our traditional market.”

Housing is less affordable: In January of 2012, the median price for a home in the area was around $135,000. More than two and a half years later, home values have jumped by about 85 percent. In contrast, median salaries have not seen a similar jump, which is understandable given how much farther home values dropped in relation to wages.

Even as the pace of home value increases started normalizing at a slower rate, however, wages continue to be flat.

In 2013, for example, wages saw growth in the last three quarters after posting a decline in the first three months of the year, according to the Nevada Department of Training, Employment and Rehabilitation. The 1.1 percent increase in overall wages that year failed to keep pace with inflation, which grew by 1.5 percent.

Meanwhile, an estimated 55 percent of houses in Northern Nevada are affordable to the area’s median income earners, compared to 62 percent nationwide, according to the Lied Institute.

Flat wages are a concern for maintaining continued growth in the housing market and the economy, specifically as it relates to first-time home sales.

“New home sales generate more economic activity than a housing move from one part of town to another,” Ashworth said. “That’s because new home buyers buy more new furniture and appliances and do more remodeling, so they generate more economic activity.”

Although houses are less affordable now than they were two years ago, the situation still does not compare to the peak of the housing boom. At the bubble’s peak in 2006, for example, only 18 percent of homes could be afforded by median income earners in Northern Nevada despite a record 4,518 homes being actively listed in July.

California also continues to be a key part of the local real estate market’s equation. Androo Allen, interim president of the Builders Association of Northern Nevada, remembers the buyer mix for one high-end community project. Of the 19 homes it sold, 18 of the buyers came from Nevada’s next door neighbor.

New homes are back: After the collapse of the housing bubble, the hum of bulldozers on new home construction sites went silent. With the value of new homes going up, however, new housing is back in business.

Reno posted 1,387 new home starts in the second quarter of this year, up 43 percent over the same period last year, according to Metrostudy. Meanwhile, only 36 percent of homes are priced below $300,000 compared to 64 percent last year.

This is causing many builders to finish rough cut lands that were started during the boom but got paused during the recession.

“We’re starting to see more confidence among builders, including the smaller ones,” said BANN’s Allen. “The price of a new home has gone up enough for a builder to absorb the development cost of a lot … and still come out with a profit.”

At the same time, smaller builders aren’t jumping full steam into the new building craze like larger builders. Although, they like to see price increases in new homes, they don’t want a repeat of the unsustainable spikes seen during the bubble days and the ensuing crash, Allen said. At the time, builders were making houses as fast as they could as buyers were snapping houses, at times sight unseen.

“We don’t want to see rapid growth, we want to see slow, consistent growth,” Allen said. “The market needs to define itself first so the next 12 to 18 months will determine just how solid it is.”

Unit sales are down from last year: Although year-over-year house sales saw steady increases in the first half of 2014, the last few months are a different story. In July, for example, 520 homes were sold in Reno-Sparks compared to 591 during the same month last year. The trend continued in August, which posted 548 sales in contrast to 638 units the previous year.

The RSAR’s Ashworth attributes the dip to a variety of factors, including lower inventory and the return of new home sales.

Demand remains healthy in relation to market supply, however. Supply for regular homes with no special conditions is at 2.5 months — 1.6 months for short sales and 2 months for foreclosure sales. There are 1,385 active listings in Reno-Sparks as of early September.

“Demand has remained constant for the year and that indicates desirability in the market,” Ashworth said.

North vs. South: While real estate trends in Northern Nevada and Southern Nevada mirror each other in many ways, there are also differences. One interesting difference, according to the Lieds Institute, is that building starts for single-family homes are up year-over-year in the north but down in the south.

Conversely, multi-family starts, which includes multi-unit facilities such as apartments, are up in the south but down in the north.

Fewer homeowners are underwater: Nearly three in four Northern Nevadans have equity in their homes, according to the Lied Institute. That’s a big improvement from the 2009-2010 period when only 27 percent of homeowners were not underwater on their mortgage.

With banks being more judicious in putting distressed properties in the market, the market likely won’t see a repeat of 2009, according to Ashworth.

“They basically flooded the market in 2009 with foreclosures and that’s why prices plummeted,” Ashworth said. “”Hopefully, they learned their lesson.”

There’s less distress: Only 14 percent of homes sold in Reno-Sparks involve a distressed property. That’s a big change from 2010 to 2011, when troubled houses accounted for 80 percent of sales.

“Foreclosures haven’t changed much over the past year (but) there are less than half as many short sales now as there were this time last year,” Counts said.

Data from the Washoe County Recorder’s office back Counts’ claim. Through August, the county posted 640 short sales, a large drop from the 1,485 it recorded last year.

Part of it could be related to the lack of an extension from the federal government regarding so far for a deficiency forgiveness program related to short sales.

Meanwhile, there are also continuing concerns about the bank-owned properties still out there.

“The elephant in the room that everybody sees and nobody talks about is shadow inventory,” Ashworth said. “You can see homes in neighborhoods that don’t have a for sale sign but are boarded up and unoccupied. As long as they come to the market slowly, then that’s fine.”

Overall, however, the Northern Nevada real estate market is on the right track, according to Counts. One thing everyone agreed on, however, is that the area is not quite out of the woods yet.

“Home prices are still gradually increasing and the construction industry is still building homes that can sell,” Counts said. “However, we still have a long way to go before to get to where we were before the housing market collapse.”

 

http://www.rgj.com/story/money/business/2014/09/21/trends-reno-real-estate-market/15976175/

Voted Best Realtor in Northern Nevada

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I wanted to thank the people of Northern Nevada for Voting me as the “Best Realtor In Northern Nevada”

The annual popularity contest, the Biggest Little Best of Northern Nevada, once again has succeeded beyond our wildest dreams. Five thousand and ninety-three verified voters and 121,605 votes in all categories. It’s frankly unprecedented. 

This year, is the 20th for this contest, it was chosen to highlight the contributions of individuals and business make to the Truckee Meadows culture. Business owners, activists, artists and promoters all got into the act to promote. Of course, there were also the impresarios who took the opportunity to raise their own profile in the community, but hey, all’s fair in love and Best of.

Thank you to everyone that made me their selection for “BEST REAL ESTATE AGENT IN NORTHERN NEVADA.

Capture 

Vote for me as Best Realtor in Reno/Sparks

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I have to a favor to ask and I need your help. Would you be willing to vote for me for “Best Realtor in Reno? It’s a bit of a pain to do it but you will feel all warm and fuzzy inside for doing it. Here is the scoop. It also has to be done by 4 am of July 25. 

Here it is. Go to newsreview.com/reno/home. Next look at the upper right hand corner where is says, ‘BEST” in Red. Double click and it comes up to register. If you already are registered just place password in. If not, you need to register and verify your email, blah, blah, blah… Then I am under the Personalities icon, second from end, at the top of the voting page. Of course if you have your favorites, add them but I am sending what I mailed to my out of Reno friends, just in case you don’t have favorites in these spots. You have to have at least 10 entries or they throw it out.

Looking to buy a new home? Follow these steps:

Congratulations! You’re buying your first home, grabbing part of the American dream, and building wealth over time.

But buying your first home can be confusing and anxiety provoking. What features are must-haves, and which are someday dreams? What do you need to get a mortgage? These guidelines will make the process easier to navigate.

The Right Steps

A little research and prep can go a long way to getting you through the homeownership door with minimum stress.

Make sure your credit is in good shape. The better your credit score, the better your chance of getting a lower-rate mortgage. Check your credit report for mistakes and for any credit problems you can correct. You can get a free report from each of the three credit bureaus once a year at annualcreditreport.com.

Related: 4 Tips to Improve Your Credit Score

Work with a REALTOR® who’s a buyer’s agent. A buyer’s agent will advocate and negotiate for you, not the seller. 

Learn about the neighborhoods you’re interested in. What’s the crime rate? How are the schools? A REALTOR® can help you with that and help you target your buying interests. For instance, what tops your priority list? Short commute to work? Lots of land? Three bedrooms? A community governed by a homeowners association?

Understand the broader real estate market. Are home prices going up or down? Is the economy strong or shaky? These economic factors will affect the value of your home today and in the future.

Figure your buying budget. Besides the downpayment, which could range from 5% to 20% depending on your circumstances, you’ll want to plan for costs such as:

  • The appraisal (about $300 to $600). It estimates the property’s value at a point in time. It lets you and the lender know how the sales price compares with the appraised value.
  • Loan origination fees. The cost of making the loan, including an origination charge, processing fee, underwriting fee, and even points on the loan. These fees are usually .05% to 1% of the loan.
  • Title insurance. Protects a buyer or lender against loss from title defects, liens, or other issues. Fees are generally 1% of the loan amount.
  • The inspection. A thorough inspection (roughly $300 to $500, depending on the property type) can reveal hidden defects, reducing your risk of incurring surprise expenses later. Plus, it offers the opportunity to negotiate for a price reduction or for the sellers to make repairs, depending on the findings.

A Few More Safe-Buying Tips

Shop around for the best deal on a mortgage. Consider your financing options: The longer the loan, the smaller your monthly payment. Fixed-rate mortgages offer payment certainty; an adjustable-rate mortgage offers a lower monthly payment, but an ARM may adjust dramatically. 

Get prequalified. Meet with a lender to get a prequalification letter that says how much house you’re qualified to buy. That lets sellers know you’re serious.

To get prequalified, you’ll need to gather some paperwork for your lender. Most want to see W-2 forms verifying your employment and income, copies of pay stubs, and two to four months of banking statements.  If you’re self-employed, you’ll need your current profit-and-loss statement, a current balance sheet, and personal and business income tax returns for the previous two years. 

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